Dealing with Damp

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Dealing with Damp

   Dealing with Damp

 

 

Mold and Mildew in corner of a room photo

How to Deal with Mold or Mildew Photo

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Condensation

Condensation is the most common kind of damp and is caused by moist air condensing on walls. It's mainly a winter problem, as at this time of year walls are much colder than the air inside. Condensation can be exacerbated by poor ventilation, and heating that comes on and off, as this allows warm, damp air to condense.

What are the symptoms of condensation

You may notice water droplets on windows or walls, see dark mould appearing and/or notice an unpleasant smell. If left untreated, condensation can damage paint and plaster and cause window frames to decay.

How to deal with condensation

Condensation can be improved with better ventilation. In the bathroom and kitchen ensure that fans are switched on or a window is open for ventilation.

You can also find that having your heating on constantly at a lower heat is better than having it switching from high to off.

Mould or mildew

The sight of mould and mildew on your walls can really make a living room or bathroom look unsightly and unclean.

Mould and mildew can be caused by condensation from a variety of household chores, including boiling the water in a kettle, irons and drying clothes. A build-up of dirt or dust on your walls is the perfect food for bacteria to feed on and spread.

How to deal with mould or mildew

Wash mould or mildew with diluted household bleach (one part bleach three parts water mixed together) as soon as it appears, as it's harder to remove once it's been there a while.

Open windows to improve airflow while you clean as fumes can be toxic if you do not ventilate as you clean.

Be sure you do not scrub too hard and remove any paint or varnish.

Always read and follow the safety messages on household cleaning products bottles before using and wear rubber gloves when handling bleach or similar products.

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